Serving more than Healthy Meals to Seniors

September 25, 2013

James is a new senior resident at one of downtown San Diego’s single room occupancy hotels. James is new in San Diego and has no family or friends nearby. The small room is equipped with a twin bed and a tiny sink; bathrooms are shared with other hotel residents. Paying for the hotel room to avoid living on the streets is about all that James can afford.

James found out about Senior Community Centers home delivered meals program through other hotel residents and called to sign up as well. Kimberly, one of our home delivered meals drivers, came by the next day with a hot and nutritious lunch as well as breakfast for the next day. On Fridays, our drivers deliver breakfast and lunch for Friday, Saturday and Sunday. Unfortunately, James had to decline the meals because he could not store or heat up the food.

Letting one of our clients go hungry for an entire weekend – and many other weekends to follow – is not an option.  Senior Community Centers’ Food Service Director took extra ordinary measures and discovered a small fridge and a microwave in working condition in our limited storage space.

James was very grateful and surprised when Kimberly delivered a fridge and microwave along with fresh meals during her next visit! We sure made his day and are excited to know that James has access to healthy food seven days a week.

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Find out more about our Home Delivered Meals Program at www.servingseniors.org.

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Picture of the Month: City Council President Todd Gloria Serves Lunch

August 30, 2013

Todd Gloria

San Diego City Council President Todd Gloria and his team served lunch at the Gary and Mary West Senior Wellness Center this month. While seniors always feel honored to greet and chat with Mr. Gloria, Violet was especially excited about her special birthday experience!

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Want to serve lunch and put big smiles on our seniors’ faces? Visit www.servingseniors.org and find out How to Help!



Encore Careers: Resources and Success Stories

June 28, 2013

It’s never too late to follow your dream and spend your days doing what you love. In fact, entering an Encore Career can be a lot more rewarding than simply working to get by. For whatever reason you decide to remain in the workforce past the traditional retirement age, you might as well enjoy it.

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Jan (standing) retired from her career in education in 2001 and continues to work as a consultant in addition to volunteering multiple times a week to serve lunch to seniors at Senior Community Centers.

Baby Boomers in their 60s and 70s have most likely had a first career and already built a life for themselves and their families. Entering a second career therefore comes with a lot less pressure and serves as a healthy way to spend the golden years. It may take a little while to get hired, but it’s worth it. Here is a list of resources and success stories of people loving their Encore Careers:

“A whopping 25 million Americans between 44-70 hope to start their own businesses in the coming 5-10 years, according to a 2011 MetLife Foundation study. Half want to start what they consider a socially responsible enterprise.”

“I was 66 years old when I received my firefighter certification, which supposedly made me the oldest person, or at least oldest female ever, to achieve the certification in the state, and possibly in all of New England.”

“While Encore.org is not a job placement service, it provides free, comprehensive information that helps people transition to jobs in the nonprofit world and the public sector.”

The article from Next Avenue covers how to create an Encore Resume and dispels myths about Encore Careers.

This concludes the 3-piece series on Encore Careers. Please join the conversation and share your success stories below.


State of the Agency Highlights

June 27, 2013

Senior Community Centers is closing out Fiscal Year 2012/2013 and we are ready to face any challenges that the new year may bring. As we highlight our milestones and future growth opportunities, I am thankful for the supporters we have welcomed to our family over the past 40+ years.

During our State of the Agency reception, one of our first board members who began her service in 1972, had the chance to meet newly appointed board members. Young professionals who thrive in their roles as board interns shared creative ideas for introducing new friends to the organization. A senior client who is a part of our supportive housing program, showcased his musical talent side-by-side with our Support Services Case Manager. Senior Community Centers is the type of organization that creates lifelong friendships and fosters mutually beneficial relationships for everyone involved. Our success and wide reach in the community is a result of these relationships.

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(Tommy, resident at Potiker Family Senior Residence, and Joe, Support Services Case Manager performed together to kick off our meeting)

We work together to keep low-income seniors healthy and we defer the need for long-term care by stepping in where this vulnerable population needs us most. With the help of our friends and over 40+ years of experience, Senior Community Centers is able to:

  • Serve more meals to even more seniors
  • Expand case management services in multiple languages
  • Add transitional housing units to our homeless prevention program
  • Offer new and exciting community education classes
  • Invest in pilot programs to virtually connect home-bound clients

If you would like to become a part of this outstanding family that has so much to offer, please choose your level of involvement from Senior Community Centers’  How To Help list or consider becoming a volunteer.


Encore Careers: Remaining in the Workforce Past the Traditional Retirement Age

June 14, 2013

This is part one of a three-piece series on Encore Careers. As more and more Baby Boomers reach retirement age, many actually remain in the workforce or reinvent themselves for an Encore Career.  Reasons for remaining employed are as diverse as the seniors facing those decisions.

“Work is not about the money. I want to stay busy.” ~Archie Moore Jr.

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At Senior Community Centers 14 percent of our workforce is 65 years or older. Not long ago the typical American’s goal was to retire before age 65 but now more workers are pushing back retirement into their 70s.

Statistics show that 18.5 percent of Americans age 65 and over were still working in 2012, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Baby boomers are staying in the workforce for a multitude of reasons. They are trying to help cover the costs associated with their children’s college tuition while caring for their aging parents. Does that sound familiar? Others continue to work after their retirement savings took a deep hit during the recession. In addition, many Americans are now living into their late 80s and 90s outliving their retirement savings.

“Being a senior myself opened my eyes on how the senior population was neglected and I wanted to do something with my own hands to help.” (Archie Moore Jr.)

For many older adults having a purpose and making a difference in the community is what keeps them in the workforce. “Work is not about the money. I want to stay busy.” says Archie Moore, Jr., age 70. After 25 years in sales, over 15 years as a pharmacist and two college degrees, Archie felt he was most needed serving seniors in downtown San Diego and joined Senior Community Centers’ Nutrition Program where he continues to make a difference not just for himself but for our community.

It’s never too late to reinvent yourself and follow your passion. What keeps you actively engaged in today’s workforce?

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Check back next Friday for Part 2 covering Encore Careers: 6 Tips that Help Baby Boomers get Hired.



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